Jacob Rees-Mogg Self-Strung and Slaughtered

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Normally the quintessence of English upper-crust calm confidence, Jacob Rees-Mogg revealed his and the Conservative Party’s inner turmoil and concurrent denial of this by erupting in a pompous linguistic riposte to being quizzed by Jon Snow on tonight’s Channel 4 News.

Snow was putting it to JRM that his Party was in a shambles, an assessment Mogg tried to continually dismiss against Snow’s repeated assertion, culminating in JRM bursting forth with the declaration it is not a butcher’s slaughterhouse!

Snow immediately made clear that wasn’t his term [seizing on, as I’m sure we all were, the extraordinary ‘admission by rejection’ in JRM using such an expression] only for Mogg to counter, haughtily, with his dismay that Snow didn’t realise this was the definition for shambles.

Well, that linguistic linkage was news to me – as well as Google search [though a deep dictionary trawl will find a link as ‘archaic’] – but it was a moment of the most gloriously pedantic foot-stomping from the usually serene toff.

Perhaps aware of his childishly arrogant attack, Mogg tried to regain ground with an ascendant declarative by stating – without any visible personal self-mockery or sense that he was pissed out of his brain – the country is completely stable.

Smug Treachery In and Out of Government

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Michael Gove’s suck-up success in being named new environment secretary [in charge of cleaning up his own shit?] is, I think, the consequence of Channel 4 having arranged an interview with him a few days before the election on the expectation that, based on comments Gove had may that day, he would criticise May on previous terrorism legislation or similar: instead, Gove used the time to grease out the most obnoxious and obsequious support for her before Jon Snow shut him up for being ‘inaudible’.

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Osbourne’s moment of payback is in its brutal back-stab of a senior political has-been as absurdly ironic as his statement when personally well-to-do Chancellor of austerity: We are all in this together.

Compass Pointing to the Many, Not the Few

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I was in Manchester on election night having arrived there to begin preparations for a summer of GCSE English Literature examining. This has begun today in earnest now that I am home, and for the coming weeks I will not have time for regular postings on this blog, though necessary breaks will allow for occasional observations.

It occurred to me that my last posting here was of the nastiness of the right-wing media/press and their persistent misrepresentations of and spiteful lies about Labour and, in particular, Jeremy Corbyn.

I don’t need to revisit this further, and in light of Corbyn’s and Labour’s election success in repudiating and usurping that fake and nefarious news, I will post a celebration of what so many in this country – not the majority, yet – have in reality shown their inclination for and increasing desire to support.

No More

In a
suffering life
pain is its
documentary

or music of
paint,

Monet cello
playing strains of
blue and
magenta –

some obvious
mood

as a bridge
reaching across
a pond

arched tragically.

What is
what flows
below,

lilies transported
along?

This is not
surreal.

Whether colours can
represent,

this is not
surreal.

It is the
opposite.

A suffering life,
palpable,
plays as a comment,

no more.

Moral Compass

With the events of Saturday into Sunday in London, I did not post this yesterday.

I also do not want to enter the murky mire of too much analysis and commentary on the event itself, and its coverage in the national media. I have of late, however, with family and friends, been discussing the need to read beyond my regular The Guardian to gauge how other media outlets, but especially the newspapers, have differing views and opinions on aspects of terrorism and dealing with this, as well as broader political issues, not least the imminent General Election.

One clear statement before I proceed: I completely abhor and make no excuses for the recent terrorist attacks here in the UK, or anywhere in the world.

So, yesterday, I did go to read The Mail Online. If this is the moral compass that newspaper takes when commenting on these attacks – the Hopkins focus juxtaposed/joined with the trash of the sidebar – then I do not feel the need to explore any further than my regular liberal, yes, but sane read:

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